Materials

Leather

We have always worked with vegetable tanned leather which we source from a tannery on the outskirts of Florence. They follow strict and thorough regulations on how to produce leather in the most sustainable way possible.


Vegetable Tanning

 

Vegetable tanning is a more environmentally friendly alternative to chrome dyed leather where the colour is derived from natural properties such as tree bark, flowers and roots. This process to produce a full grain piece is complicated and lengthy but has indispensable effects which leaves the leather to develop their own unique patina over the years and if looked after well, can last for generations.


Our Tannery and Their Responsibility Commitments

 

The tannery that we have chosen to be been affiliated with are based in Tuscany and have been producing naturally tanned leather since 1945. They only use skins that are a by-product of the meat industry taken from Sweden, Denmark and Belgium, known for their high ethical farming standards. Caring for the workers and the environment has been deeply rooted in their core values, acting as a member and founder of Pelle al Vegetale which teaches, promotes and supports sustainable leather production.

To find out more about the consortium please visit http://www.pellealvegetale.it/en/.

 

Leather Tannery

 

 

Hemp

 

Why we choose to use hemp…

…it’s quite simple, really; hemp is a highly superior material capable of decreasing carbon dioxide in our atmosphere, growing anywhere with low water usage and zero pesticides, enriching the soil and helping the farmers make a profitable return. It is an organic fibre that is environmentally friendly throughout its lifecycle. Sounds pretty amazing, right? We think so too.

Hemp has had a contoversial reputation for many years now but since the passing of the 2018 Farm Bill in the USA, it can once again be legally farmed. Hemp is a strain of cannabis which has extremely low THC levels, the psychoactive substance at less than 0.3%, unlike the marijuana strain which has between 5% and 20%.



hemp fabric

The Benefits of Hemp

  • Hemp is extremely adaptable and can thrive in any climate with minimal care. For example, cotton needs twice as much water than hemp to grow, and in our current vulnerable climate using hemp instead can drastically help to reduce draughts in drier regions whilst reducing negative impacts on the environment.
  • Hemp is a natural fibre that is incredibly durable and strong, often having a longer life span than its competitors and has the ability to keep its shape without stretching or distorting over time.
  • Hemp plants have the ability to absorb four times more carbon dioxide than trees and produce more oxygen. With the current climate emergency, switching to hemp products will increase the demand for farming and could ultimately help to reduce global carbon dioxide levels in our atmosphere.
  • Unlike cotton, hemp uses zero pesticides and herbicides as it can naturally repel pests. This means that local water ways are not polluted and can continue to thrive, providing important food and water sources to rural communities.
  • The soil remains rich and undamaged by the chemicals allowing for better yielding as the crop can be replanted after each harvest. Hemp can naturally enrich the soil and restore any vital nutrients.
  • Growing hemp is both economically and ecologically beneficial, without wasting any land or having fallow periods, farmers are able to harvest the crop 3 to 4 times a year which gives them a stable and fair income throughout the year.
  • Hemp is biodegradable.
  • Hemp fibres are naturally water resistant.
  • Hemp is a hypoallergenic which means that even those with sensitive skin can comfortably wear the material.

 

 

There are many other benefits of hemp and there are hundreds of other uses for it such as paper, rope, biofuel, hempcrete (a concrete alternative) and even as a plastic alternative to name a few.

We love the material and its potential for our future!